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Mite Teams

Mite Hockey

Contact Information:

Mark Duchene

Mite Coordinator

Phone: 507-412-0447


Additional Info to help Mite Players and Parents

Players and Parents,

Three rules we try to instill in our players and coaches:

  1. Have Fun
  2. Give it your best
  3. Be a good teammate

Thank You

Thank you to all the people (coaches, running the clock, putting bumpers on the ice, opening doors, etc.) who are willing to help where needed to make the mite program the best in can be.  We are still looking for more coaches so if interested please contact The Faribault Hockey Association's "Hockey Operations Committee" (HOC).  Even if you don’t know how to skate well but know how to skate we can always use the help.  Ideally, we like to have two coaches at each station to keep the kids engaged.

Saturday and Sunday Practices

Want to highlight: Every Saturday and Sunday all Mites will be together working on stations.  We also plan on having grandparent days (a Saturday or Sunday) where the kids will break into three groups and play a jamboree (against each other and NOT the grandparents)…more information to come later.

Is it Okay to be the Best Player/What if I don’t make the team I wanted (now or future)

Information from Minnesota Hockey

Many players and parents underestimate how difficult it is to jump to the next level and, for O’Leary (Pat O’Leary, head boys’ hockey coach at Wayzata High School), the benefits of being the best player on the ice far outweigh taking the chance of moving up a bit early.

Don’t Ruin Your Confidence

Success fuels confidence. If your child moves up too soon, odds are that production isn’t going to be as high, and thus confidence in ability can go down. There is nothing wrong with being the best player on the team.

“From a confidence standpoint moving up is extremely detrimental,” said MacMillan. “What’s wrong with being that kid that scored 30-plus goals? Now you have the confidence to do it again in your second year. Without confidence, a player doesn’t think he or she can accomplish much and putting a kid lacking confidence in any game situation is never going to have a positive outcome.”

Players can find confidence in improving from year one to year two at the same level, too. That’s a quality coaches love to see.

“As a coach, having a kid who doesn’t make the best team his entire career and plays at the level he’s meant to be playing is a great thing because it means he knows how to work hard and you know that he wants to always keep improving,” O’Leary said. “If you’re in the right spot for you, you’re going to succeed because you’re learning and you’re having fun. You’re actually touching the puck every game and at practice, and that’s what’s important. Every year has to be a battle, and every year you have to try to get better.”

Don’t Rush Development

Each specific age group from Mites to Bantams is designed around Long Term Athlete Development – working to get the best development for every player. At each age group is a specific window of trainabilityMove a player up too soon out of that age-specific window and odds are you’re doing more harm than good when it comes to his or her development.

“I’ve never found moving up a benefit for player development,” USA Hockey National Coach-in-Chief and Director of CCM Minnesota Hockey High Performance programs Mike MacMillan said. “I don’t buy that just because you’re playing up that is going to make you better. And in a lot of cases, it stunts the growth of some of those top kids.

“Players need to focus on mastering the skill levels and windows they are at before they even consider moving up to try to learn the next one. You might be good after year one of Squirts or Peewees, but year two is designed to improve and become even better. It’s about being patient in development. There are more Ryan McDonaghs in the world that were just patient with their development.”

Don’t Overlook Why You Play the Game

You play hockey because it’s fun. Sure there are dreams of a future playing the game, but as a kid the focus should be on the love of the game, not the love for a potential NHL career.

Focus on playing where you’re at. Don’t worry about the quickest route to get you there.

“Enjoy every single year you play,” O’Leary said. “Whether it’s the B2-Squirts, A-Squirts or B-Bantam, enjoy the game that you’re playing because it goes fast. There will be a time that it doesn’t matter what team you played for, but the fact that you played will stay with you forever.”

SSM Small Rink Practices

  • Suggestion: parents dress warm as it is a cold rink.  I get my kid dress at home with tennis shoes on and put their skates, helmet and gloves on at rink.
  • Main ssm arena parking lot far left corner)
  •  

Help your player succeed in Hockey and Life

I hope you as a player and the parents know how much we the coaches want you as a player succeed in hockey and in the game of life.  Please continue to live our rules of: have fun, give it your best and be the best teammate.  These will help you be the best player you can be.

 

Your Mite Coaches



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Mites

MITE HOCKEY (8 years old and younger) - Encourages the skill level development of all players. This is particularly critical at the Mite level so that players are provided with the foundation to enjoy and have success in the game.

·        The focus for Mites is to teach and develop the basic skills of skating, puck handling, shooting and passing.

·        Mites are generally organized into levels based on age, skill and the number of Mite players.

WHY is this a GREAT SPORT:

· Form lasting friendships

· Builds confident kids

· Great exercise

· It is Fun and a Great Time!!!


A Typical Mites Schedule

2-3 days a week: Saturday (late Saturday mornings at Faribault Ice Arena) and Sunday (later afternoon at Faribault Ice Arena) then one weeknight at FIA or Shattuck's 3on3 Rink.


Five Reasons Why Kids Should Play Sports

 

1. Kids who play sports do better in school. You might think that athletics will take up all your study time. But research shows that kids who play sports do better in school than those who don't. Exercise improves learning, memory, and concentration, which can give active kids an advantage in the classroom.

2. Kids who play sports learn teamwork and goal-setting skills. Sports teaches valuable life skills. When you working with coaches, trainers, and teammates to win games and achieve goals, you're learning how to be successful. Those skills will serve you well at work and in family life.

3. Sports are good for a kids health. In addition to being fit and maintaining a healthy weight, kids who play sports are also less likely to smoke.

4. Playing sports boosts self-confidence. Kids who play sports feel better about themselves. Why? It builds confidence when you know you can practice, improve, and achieve your goals. Sports are also a feel-good activity because they help girls and boys get in shape, maintain a healthy weight, and make new friends.

5. Exercise cuts the pressure. Playing sports can lessen stress and help you feel a little happier. How? The brain chemicals released during exercise improve a person's mood. Friends are another mood-lifter. And being on a team creates tight bonds between friends. It's good to know your teammates will support you — both on and off the ice!

 

Make the Most of Mite Hockey

When you’re between the ages of 5 and 8 years old, trying something new can be intimidating.

Click here to read

8 Myths of Mite Hockey

Some of the biggest myths in hockey involve our youngest players, those at the 8U level and the use of cross-ice hockey.

Click here to read